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Lucien Sarti

Lucien Sarti


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Lucien Sarti worked for the French-Corsican heroin trafficker and convicted Nazi collaborator, Auguste Joseph Ricord. It was claimed by the journalist Stephen Rivele, that Antoine Guerini organized the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. According to his contact, Christian David, the killing was carried out by Sarti and two other members of the Marseilles mob. It is believed Sarti fired from behind the wooden fence on the grassy knoll. The first shot was fired from behind and hit Kennedy in the back. The second shot was fired from behind, and hit John Connally. The third shot was fired from in front, and hit Kennedy in the head. The fourth shot was from behind and missed.

Lucien Sarti was officially killed by Mexican police in Mexico City on 27th April, 1972. His death was not reported in the United States at the time. However, it was in France's leading newspaper, Le Monde. It reported that the killing of Sarti was the result of a "close Mafia-police-Narcotics Bureau collaboration" in the United States to "shatter Corsican influence in the worldwide narcotics traffic, and create a virtual monopoly for the U.S.-Italian Mafia connection, whose key figure was Santo Trafficante."

Peter Dale Scott perceptively points out in the introduction to The Politics of Heroin (Alfred W. McCoy): "If the Washington Post and the New York Times, the supposed exposer's of Watergate, had picked up on stories like the one in Le Monde, then the history of Watergate might have been altered... for the history of Nixon's involvement in Watergate is intertwined with that of his personal involvement in drug enforcement. Nixon's public declaration in June 1971 of his war on heroin promptly led his assemblage of White House Plumbers, Cubans, and even hit squads".

Henrik Kruger argues in The Great Heroin Coup that the "remarkable shift from Marseilles (Corsican) to Southeast Asian and Mexican (Mafia) heroin in the United States... was a deliberate move to reconstruct and redirect the heroin trade... not to eliminate it."

The initial turning point was the first meeting that I had with the French narcotics trafficker at Leavenworth Penitentiary. His name was Christian David. He had been a member of the old French Connection heroin network. He had then been a leader of the Corsican drug trafficking network in South America known as the Latin Connection. And he had also been an intelligence agent for a number of intelligence services around the world. In exchange for my help in finding him an attorney to represent him against the possibility of his deportation to France after he finished his sentence at Leavenworth, he agreed to give me a certain amount of information concerning the assassination based upon his own knowledge. The first thing that he told me, very reluctantly and only after four or five hours of my arguing with him, was that he was aware that there had been a conspiracy to murder the president, and indeed in May or June of 1963 in Marseilles, he had been offered the contract to kill President Kennedy. That was the initial breakthrough, if you will. He was eventually deported to France. I remained in contact with him. I went to Paris to interview him in two prisons in Paris. And in the fear that he would be either committed to an asylum or that he would be convicted of an old murder charge, he gradually gave me additional information about the assassination.

David’s position was that there were three killers, and that they had been hired on a contract which had been placed with the leader of the Corsican Mafia at Marseilles, a man named Antoine Guerini. Guerini, he said, was asked to supply three assassins of high quality, experienced killers to murder the President, and that Guerini did so. In the course of one of the first significant conversations I had with David on this subject, he told me that he had been in Marseilles in May or June of 1963, and that every evening he went to Antoine Guerini’s club on the old Port of Marseilles to meet people who owed him money. And one evening, Guerini sent for him, asked him to come to the office which was above the club. Guerini told him that he had an important contract, and he asked David if he were interested. David said, "Who’s the contract on?" Guerini said, "an American politician." David asked, "Well is it a congressman, a senator?" And Guerini said, "higher than that... The highest vegetable." At that point of course David knew who he was talking about. David asked him where was the contract to be carried out. And when Guerini said it would be done inside the United States, David refused on the grounds that that was much too dangerous.

In May or June of 1963, he was offered a contract by Antoine Guerini, the Corsican crime boss in Marseilles, to accept a contract to kill "a highly placed American politician" whom Guerini called the "biggest vegetable"- i.e., President Kennedy. The president was to be killed on US territory. David told Rivele that he turned down the contract because it was too dangerous. After David turned down the contract offer, he said it was accepted by Lucien Sarti, another Corsican drug trafficker and killer, and two other members of the Marseilles mob, whom he refused to name. David said he learned what happened about two years after the assassination in a meeting in Buenos Aires, during which Sarti, another drug trafficker named Michele Nicoli, David, and two others were present. During the meeting, the assassination of John F. Kennedy was discussed. This is how the assassination was carried out as David told it to Rivele.

About two weeks before the assassination, Sarti flew from France to Mexico City, from where he drove or was driven to the US border at Brownsville, Texas. Sarti crossed at Brownsville where he was picked up by someone from the Chicago mafia. This person drove him to a private house in Dallas. He did not stay at a hotel, as not to leave records. David believes that Sarti was traveling on an Italian passport. David said the assassins cased Dealey Plaza, took photographs and worked out mathematically how to set up a crossfire. Sarti wanted to fire from the triple underpass bridge, but when he arrived in Dealey Plaza the day of the assassination, there were people there, so he fired from a little hill next to the bridge. There was a wooden fence on that hill, and Sarti fired from behind the wooden fence. He said Sarti only fired once, and used an explosive bullet. He said Kennedy was shot in a crossfire, two shots from behind, and Sarti's shot from the front. Of the two assassins behind, one was high, and one was low. He said you can't understand the wounds if you don't realize that one gun was low, "almost on the horizontal." The first shot was fired from behind and hit Kennedy in the back. The second shot was fired from behind, and hit "the other person in the car." The third shot was fired from in front, and hit Kennedy in the head. The fourth shot was from behind and missed "because the car was too far away." He said that two shots were almost simultaneous.

David said that Kennedy was killed for revenge and money. He said the CIA was incapable of killing Kennedy, but did cover it up. He said the gunmen stayed at the private house in Dallas for approximately two weeks following the assassination, then believes they went to Canada, that there were people in Canada who had the ability to fly them out of North America.

My own conviction at this point is that the contract probably originated with Carlos Marcello of New Orleans who placed it in Marseilles through his colleague Santo Trafficante, Jr. who had the closest relations with Antoine Guérini. Beyond that, it seems reasonable that Giancana of Chicago was involved if we accept Christian David and Michel Nicoli’s idea that the assassins were met at the border by representatives of the Chicago Mafia. And the fact that Sarti’s customers were primarily in New York, and the fact that the assassins evidently moved out of the United States through the Montreal corridor, which was very closely linked to the New York Mafia, also suggests that Gambino may have been involved.


French Gunman Grassy Knoll - Lucien Sarti

The Last Confessions of E. Howard Hunt

Rolling Stone Magazine | April 5, 2007

He was the ultimate keeper of secrets, lurking in the shadows of American history. He toppled banana republics, planned the Bay of Pigs invasion and led the Watergate break-in. Now he would reveal what he'd always kept hidden: who killed JFK

Once, when the old spymaster thought he was dying, his eldest son came to visit him at his home in Miami. The scourges recently had been constant and terrible: lupus, pneumonia, cancers of the jaw and prostate, gangrene, the amputation of his left leg. It was like something was eating him up. Long past were his years of heroic service to the country. In the CIA, he'd helped mastermind the violent removal of a duly elected leftist president in Guatemala and assisted in subterfuges that led to the murder of Che Guevara. But no longer could you see in him the suave, pipe-smoking, cocktail-party-loving clandestine operative whose Cold War exploits he himself had, almost obsessively, turned into novels, one of which, East of Farewell, the New York Times once called "the best sea story" of World War II. Diminished too were the old bad memories, of the Bay of Pigs debacle that derailed his CIA career for good, of the Watergate Hotel fiasco, of his first wife's death, of thirty-three months in U.S. prisons -- of, in fact, a furious lifetime mainly of failure, disappointment and pain. But his firstborn son -- he named him St. John Saint, for short -- was by his side now. And he still had a secret or two left to share before it was all over.

They were in the living room, him in his wheelchair, watching Fox News at full volume, because his hearing had failed too. After a while, he had St. John wheel him into his bedroom and hoist him onto his bed. It smelled foul in there he was incontinent a few bottles of urine under the bed needed to be emptied but he was beyond caring. He asked St. John to get him a diet root beer, a pad of paper and a pen.

Saint had come to Miami from Eureka, California, borrowing money to fly because he was broke. Though clean now, he had been a meth addict for twenty years, a meth dealer for ten of those years and a source of frustration and anger to his father for much of his life. There were a couple of days back in 1972, after the Watergate job, when the boy, then eighteen, had risen to the occasion. The two of them, father and son, had wiped fingerprints off a bunch of spy gear, and Saint had helped in other ways, too. But as a man, he had two felony convictions to his name, and they were for drugs. The old spymaster was a convicted felon too, of course. But that was different. He was E. Howard Hunt, a true American patriot, and he had earned his while serving his country. That the country repaid him with almost three years in prison was something he could never understand, if only because the orders that got him in such trouble came right from the top as he once said, "I had always assumed, working for the CIA for so many years, that anything the White House wanted done was the law of the land."

Years had gone by when he and St. John hardly spoke. But then St. John came to him wanting to know if he had any information about the assassination of President Kennedy. Despite almost universal skepticism, his father had always maintained that he didn't. He swore to this during two government investigations. "I didn't have anything to do with the assassination, didn't know anything about it," he said during one of them. "I did my time for Watergate. I shouldn't have to do additional time and suffer additional losses for something I had nothing to do with."

But now, in August 2003, propped up in his sickbed, paper on his lap, pen in hand and son sitting next to him, he began to write down the names of men who had indeed participated in a plot to kill the president. He had lied during those two federal investigations. He knew something after all. He told St. John about his own involvement, too. It was explosive stuff, with the potential to reconfigure the JFK-assassination-theory landscape. And then he got better and went on to live for four more years.

T hey sure don't make White House bad guys the way they used to. Today you've got flabby-faced half-men like Karl Rove, with weakling names like "Scooter" Libby, blandly hacking their way through the constraints of the U.S. Constitution, while back then, in addition to Hunt, you had out-and-out thugs like G. Gordon Liddy, his Watergate co-conspirator and Nixon's dirty-tricks chief, who would hold his own hand over an open flame to prove what a real tough guy he was. It all seems a little nutty now, but in 1972 it was serious business. These guys meant to take the powers of the presidency and run amok. Hunt, an ex-CIA man who loved operating in the shadows and joined Nixon's Special Investigations Unit (a.k.a. "the Plumbers") as a $100-a-day consultant in 1971, specialized in political sabotage. Among his first assignments: forging cables linking the Kennedy administration to the assassination of South Vietnam's president. After that, he began sniffing around Ted Kennedy's dirty laundry, to see what he could dig up there. Being a former CIA man, he had no problem contemplating the use of firebombs and once thought about slathering LSD on the steering wheel of an unfriendly newspaperman's car, hoping it would leach into his skin and cause a fatal accident. But of all his various plots and subterfuges, in the end, only one of them mattered: the failed burglary at the Watergate Hotel, in Washington, D.C., in the spring of 1972.

The way it happened, Hunt enlisted some Cuban pals from his old Bay of Pigs days to fly up from Miami and bug the Democratic National Committee headquarters, which was located inside the Watergate. Also on the team were a couple of shady ex-government operators named James McCord and Frank Sturgis. The first attempt ended when the outfit's lock picker realized he'd brought the wrong tools. The next time, however, with Hunt stationed in a Howard Johnson's hotel room across the way, communicating with the burglars by walkie-talkie, the team gained entry into the office. Unfortunately, on the way into the building, they'd taped open an exit door to allow their escape, and when a night watchman found it, he called the cops. The burglars were arrested on the spot. One of them had E. Howard's phone number, at the White House, no less, in his address book. Following this lead, police arrested Hunt and charged him with burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping. Abandoned by his bosses at the White House, he soon began trying to extort money from them to help pay his mounting bills, as well as those of his fellow burglars, the deal being that if the White House paid, all those arrested would plead guilty and maintain silence about the extent of the White House's involvement.

That December, his wife, Dorothy, carrying $10,000 in $100 bills, was killed in a plane crash, foul play suspected but never proved. Two years later, impeachment imminent, Nixon resigned his presidency. And in 1973, E. Howard Hunt, the man who had unwittingly set all these events in motion, pleaded guilty and ultimately spent thirty-three months in prison. "I cannot escape feeling," he said at the time, "that the country I have served for my entire life and which directed me to carry out the Watergate entry is punishing me for doing the very things it trained and directed me to do."

O ut in eureka, a few days before his father's death, St. John is driving through town in a beat-up mottled-brown '88 Cutlass Sierra. He is fifty-two. His hair is dark, worn long, and despite his decades as a drug addict, he's still looking good. He has a Wiccan girlfriend named Mona. He's also an accomplished and soulful guitar player, leaning heavily toward Eric Clapton he can often be found playing in local haunts during open-mike nights and is working on putting a band together, perhaps to be called Saint John and the Sinners or, though less likely, the Konspirators. He's got a good sense of humor and a large sentimental streak. The last time he saw his father, in Miami, was a week ago.

"I sat by his bedside holding his hand for about ten hours the first day," St. John says somberly. "He hadn't been out of bed in ten weeks, had pneumonia twenty-seven times in the last sixteen months. He's such a tough old motherfucker, that guy. But he had all this fluid in his lungs, a death rattle, and I thought, 'Any minute now, this is it, his last breath, I'm looking at it right here.' A couple of times my stepmom, Laura, would say, 'Howard, who is this?' He'd look at me and her, and he didn't have a clue. Other times, he would quietly say, 'St. John.' He said he loved me and was grateful I was there."

At the moment, Saint doesn't have a job his felonies have gotten in the way. He has to borrow money to put gas in his Cutlass. Beach chairs substitute for furniture in the tiny apartment where, until recently, he lived with an ex-girlfriend, herself a reformed meth addict, and two kids, one hers, one theirs. "I would've loved to have lived a normal life," he says. "I'm happy with who I am. I don't have any regrets. But all the shit that happened, the whole thing, it really spun me over."

And not only him but his siblings, too -- a brother, David, who has had his own problems with drugs, and two older sisters, Kevan and Lisa, who still hold their father responsible for the tragedy of their mom's death. Dorothy Hunt was staunchly loyal to her husband and, after his arrest, helped him with his plans to blackmail the White House. On December 8th, 1972, carrying $10,000 in what's regarded as extorted hush money and, some say, evidence that could have gotten Nixon impeached, she boarded United Airlines Flight 553 from Washington to Chicago. The plane crashed, killing forty-three people onboard, including Dorothy. The official explanation was pilot error, but St. John doesn't believe it. He thinks that the Nixon White House wanted to both get rid of his mother and send a message to his father. Nonetheless, he says he tries not to place blame.

"She got on that plane willingly and lovingly, because that's the kind of woman she was," he says. "They had lots of marital problems, but when it came down to it, she had his back, and she could hang in there with the big dogs. She was really pissed at Nixon, Liddy, all those guys, and she was saying, 'We're not going to let them hang you out to dry. We're going to get them. Those motherfuckers are going to pay.' So I've never held what happened against him. I had bitterness and resentment, but I always knew he did what he had to do given the circumstances."

And at times, he even seems to think of his dad with pride: "Did you hear that the character that Tom Cruise plays in the Mission: Impossible movies is named after him? Instead of Everette Hunt, they named him Ethan Hunt. I know he's been portrayed as kind of an inept, third-rate burglar, but burglary wasn't really his bag. My dad was a really good spy, maybe a great spy."

But then he starts talking about what it was like growing up the eldest son of Everette Howard Hunt, and a different picture emerges. "He loved the glamorous life, cocktail parties, nightclubbing, flirting, all that," Saint says. "He was unfaithful to my mom, but she stayed with him. He was a swinger. He thought of himself as a cool dude, suave, sophisticated, intellectual. He was Mr. Smooth. A man of danger. He was perfect for the CIA. He never felt guilt about anything."

The middle-class son of a Hamburg, New York, attorney, E. Howard Hunt graduated from Brown University in 1940 with a bachelor's in English, joined the Navy during World War II, served in the North Atlantic on the destroyer Mayo, slipped and fell, took a medical discharge and wound up in China working under "Wild" Bill Donovan in the newly formed Office of Strategic Services. When the OSS was transformed into the CIA, Hunt jumped onboard. He loved action as much as he hated communism, and he soon began operating with a level of arrogance entirely typical of the CIA. He was instrumental, for instance, in planning the 1954 coup in Guatemala that overthrew the left-leaning, democratically elected president, Jacobo Arbenz, and ushered in forty years of military repression, which ultimately cost 200,000 Guatemalans their lives. Years later, when asked about the 200,000 deaths, E. Howard said, "Deaths? What deaths?" Like Saint says, he never felt guilt about anything: "He was a complete self-centered WASP who saw himself as this blue blood from upstate New York. 'I'm better than anybody because I'm white, Protestant and went to Brown, and since I'm in the CIA, I can do anything I want.' Jew, nigger, Polack, wop -- he used all those racial epithets. He was an elitist. He hated everybody."

In the early Fifties, his father could often be seen cruising around in a white Cadillac convertible he loved that car. He also loved his cigars and his wine and his country clubs and being waited on by servants and having his children looked after by nannies. He was full of himself and full of the romantic, swashbuckling, freewheeling importance of his government mission. He had quite an imagination, too. When he wasn't off saving the world from Reds, he spent much of his time in front of a typewriter, hacking out espionage novels, some eighty in all, with titles such as The Violent Ones ("They killed by day, they loved by night") and I Came to Kill ("They wanted a tyrant liquidated, and cash could hire him to do it").

Wherever E. Howard was stationed -- he'd pop up Zelig-like in hot spots from Japan to Uruguay to Spain -- he and his family lived lavishly and well, all presumably to lend credence to his cover job as a high-ranking embassy official. One estate was as large as a city block, and one dining table as long as a telephone pole, with the parents sitting at distant opposite ends. Sadly, he treated his children the way he and the CIA treated the rest of the world. They were supposed to bend to his will and otherwise be invisible. God forbid during a meal one of them should speak or rattle a dish.

"Whenever I made a sound, he looked at me with those hateful, steely eyes of his, a look of utter contempt and disgust, like he could kill," St. John says. "He was a mean-spirited person and an extremely cruel father. I was his firstborn son, and I was born with a clubfoot and had to have operations. I suffered from petit-mal seizures. I was dyslexic and developed a stutter. For the superspy not to have a superson was the ultimate disappointment, like, 'Here's my idiot son with the clubfoot and glasses. Can we keep him in the closet, Dorothy?' "

Later, E. Howard moved the family to the last home it would ever occupy as a family, in Potomac, Maryland. It was called Witches Island. It was a rambling affair, with a horse paddock, a chicken coop, the Cold War bonus of a bomb shelter, and a fishing pond across the way. E. Howard wanted Saint to attend a top-flight prep school and one night took him to a dinner at St. Andrew's School, to try and get his son enrolled. In the middle of the meal, Saint leaned over to his dad and whispered, "Papa, I have to go to the bathroom." His father glared at him. Pretty soon Saint was banging his knees together under the table. "Sit still," his father hissed. Saint said, "Papa, I really have to go."

"I ended up pissing in my pants at the dinner," Saint says. "Can you imagine how humiliating that was? Unbelievable." He didn't get into St. Andrew's. He ended up settling for a lower-tier boarding school called St. James, near Hagerstown, Maryland. His second year there, in 1970, after being repeatedly molested by a teacher, he broke down and told his mother what was going on. She told his father. And rumor had it that E. Howard came up to St. James with a carload of guns to make the teacher disappear. "He was really, really pissed off," says Saint. "He wanted to kill." In any case, at the school, neither the teacher nor St. John was ever seen again.

That same year, his father retired from the CIA after being relegated to the backwaters for his role in the Bay of Pigs. He went to work as a writer for a PR firm. He was bored and missed the hands-on action of the CIA.The following year, however, his lawyer pal Chuck Colson, who was special counsel to Nixon, called him up with an invitation to join the president's Special Investigations Unit as a kind of dirty-tricks consultant. He signed on. He really thought he was going places.

E. Howard's mouth fell open, and he looked at his wife. "What did he say?"

"Howard," Laura said, "he wants to know who shot JFK."

And that ended that meeting, with E. Howard grumbling to himself about Costner, "What a numskull."

But then St. John got involved, and he knew better how to handle the situation. For one thing, he knew that his stepmother wanted to forget about the past. She didn't want to hear about Watergate or Kennedy. In fact, E. Howard swore to Laura that he knew nothing about JFK's assassination it was one of her preconditions for marriage. Consequently, she and her sons often found themselves in conflict with St. John.

"Why can't you go back to California and leave well enough alone?" they asked him. "How can you do this? How dare you do this? He's in the last years of his life."

But Saint's attitude was, "This has nothing to do with you. This stuff is of historical significance and needs to come out, and if you're worried that it'll make him out to be a liar, everybody knows he's a liar already. Is this going to ruin the Hunt name? The Hunt name is already filled with ruination."

So when Saint arrived in Miami to talk to his dad, the two men spent a lot of time waiting for Laura to leave the house. Saint painted the living room and built a wheelchair ramp. In the mornings, he cooked breakfast. In the afternoons, he plopped a fishing hat on E. Howard's head and wheeled him around the neighborhood. They drank coffee together. And watched lots of Fox News. And when Laura finally left, they talked.

Afterward, another meeting was arranged with Costner, this time in Los Angeles, where the actor had fifty assassination-related questions all ready to go. (The actor declined comment for this article.) Though the $5 million figure was still floating around, all Costner wanted to pay E. Howard at this point was $100 a day for his time. There would be no advance. St. John called Costner.

"That's your offer? A hundred dollars? That's an insult. You're a cheapskate."

"Nobody calls me a cheapskate," said Costner. "What do you think I'm going to do, just hand over $5 million?"

"No. But the flight alone could kill him. He's deaf as a brick. He's pissing in a bag. He's got one leg. You want him to fly to Los Angeles and for $100 a day? Wow! What are we going to do with all that money?!"

"I can't talk to you anymore, St. John," Costner said. And that was the end of that, for good. It looked like what E. Howard had to say would never get out.

O ne evening in Eureka, over a barbecue meal, St. John explains how he first came to suspect that his father might somehow be involved in the Kennedy assassination. "Around 1975, I was in a phone booth in Maryland somewhere, when I saw a poster on a telephone pole about who killed JFK, and it had a picture of the three tramps. I saw that picture and I fucking -- like a cartoon character, my jaw dropped, my eyes popped out of my head, and smoke came out of my ears. It looks like my dad. There's nobody that has all those same facial features. People say it's not him. He's said it's not him. But I'm his son, and I've got a gut feeling."

He chews his sandwich. "And then, like an epiphany, I remember '63, and my dad being gone, and my mom telling me that he was on a business trip to Dallas. I've tried to convince myself that's some kind of false memory, that I'm just nuts, that it's something I heard years later. But, I mean, his alibi for that day is that he was at home with his family. I remember I was in the fifth grade. We were at recess. I was playing on the merry-go-round. We were called in and told to go home, because the president had been killed. And I remember going home. But I don't remember my dad being there. I have no recollection of him being there. And then he has this whole thing about shopping for Chinese food with my mother that day, so that they could cook a meal together." His father testified to this, in court, on more than one occasion, saying that he and his wife often cooked meals together.

St. John pauses and leans forward. "Well," he says, "I can tell you that's just the biggest load of crap in the fucking world. He was always looking at things like he was writing a novel everything had to be just so glamorous and so exciting. He couldn't even be bothered with his children. That's not glamorous. James Bond doesn't have children. So my dad in the kitchen? Chopping vegetables with his wife? I'm so sorry, but that would never happen. Ever. That fucker never did jack-squat like that. Ever."


N ot that it was all bad back then, in Potomac, at Witches Island. E. Howard played the trumpet, and his son was into music too, so sometimes the pair went down to Blues Alley, in Georgetown, to hear jazz. Back home, E. Howard would slap Benny Goodman's monster swing-jazz song "Sing, Sing, Sing" on the turntable, and the two would listen to it endlessly. And then, sometimes, during the stomping Harry James horn solo, E. Howard would jump to his feet, snapping his fingers like some cool cat, pull back his shirt sleeves, lick his lips and play the air trumpet for all he was worth. It was great stuff, and St. John loved it. "I would sit there in awe," he says. But the best was yet to come.

It was well past midnight on June 18th, 1972. Saint, eighteen years old, was asleep in his basement bedroom, surrounded by his Beatles and Playboy pinup posters, when he heard someone shouting, "You gotta wake up! You gotta wake up!"

When he opened his eyes, Saint saw his father as he'd never seen him before. E. Howard was dressed in his usual coat and tie, but everything was akimbo. He was a sweaty, disheveled mess. Saint didn't know what to think or what was going on.

"I don't need you to ask a lot of questions," his father said. "I need you to get your clothes on and come upstairs."

He disappeared into the darkness. Saint changed out of his pajamas. Upstairs, he found his father in the master bedroom, laboring over a big green suitcase jumble-filled with microphones, walkie-talkies, cameras, tripods, cords, wires, lots of weird stuff. His father started giving him instructions. Saint went to the kitchen and returned with Windex, paper towels and some rubber dishwashing gloves. Then, in silence, the two of them began wiping fingerprints off all the junk in the suitcase. After that, they loaded everything into E. Howard's Pontiac Firebird and drove over to a lock on the C&O Canal. E. Howard heaved the suitcase into the water, and it gurgled out of sight.

They didn't speak on the way home. St. John still didn't know what was going on. All he knew was that his dad had needed his help, and he'd given it, successfully.

The next day, dressed in one of his prep-school blazers, he drove to a Riggs Bank in Georgetown and met his father inside the safety-deposit-box cage. His father turned him around, lifted his blazer and shoved about $100,000 in cash down the back of his pants. The boy made it home without picking up a tail. Then his father had him get rid of a typewriter. Saint put the typewriter in a bag, hoofed it across the Witches Island property onto the neighboring spread and tossed it into the pond where he and his brother David used to go fishing.

"Don't ever tell anybody you've done these things," his father said later. "I could get in trouble. You could get in trouble. I'm sorry to have to put you in this position, but I really am grateful for your help."

"Of course, Papa," Saint said.

Everything he had done, he'd done because his father and his gang of pals had botched the break-in at the Watergate Hotel. Soon his mother would be killed in a plane crash, and his father would be sent to jail, and Nixon would resign, and his own life would fracture in unimaginable ways. But right now, standing there with his father and hearing those words of praise, he was the happiest he'd ever been.

Y ears later, when saint started trying to get his father to tell what he knew about JFK, he came to believe the information would be valuable. He both needed money and thought he was owed money, for what he'd been through. Also, like many a conspiracy nut before him, he was more than a little obsessed.

"After seeing that poster of the three tramps," he says, "I read two dozen books on the JFK assassination, and the more I read, the more I was unsure about what happened. I had all these questions and uncertainties. I mean, I was trying to sort out things that had touched me in a big way."

Touched him and turned him upside down, especially the death of his mother. He had been particularly close to her. She was part Native American and had sewed him a buckskin shirt that he used to wear like a badge of honor, along with a pair of moccasins. At the same time, Saint feels that he never got to know her. She told him that during World War II, she'd tracked Nazi money for the U.S. Treasury Department, and Saint believes that early in her marriage to his father, she may have been in the CIA herself, "a contract agent, not officially listed." But he isn't sure about any of it, really.

"In our family, everything was sort of like a mini-CIA," he says. "Nothing was ever talked about, so we grew up with all of these walls, walls around my father, walls around my mother, walls around us kids, to protect and insulate us. You grow up not knowing what really happened. Like, who was my mom, for Christ's sake? Was she a CIA agent? What was her life really like?" The one thing he does know is that when she died, so in large part did the Hunt family.

Once his father went to prison, Saint moved to Wisconsin, where he worked in a potato-processing plant and spent the rest of his time dropping acid. In 1975, he moved to the Oakland, California, area, started snorting coke and for five years drove a bakery truck. He was in a band and hoped to become a rock star, though touring alongside Buddy Guy was about the biggest thing that ever happened. Then he gave up coke and took up meth and a while later started dealing meth. Twenty years flew by. He had wild sexual escapades he shacked up with two sisters -- "nymphs," he calls them. But mainly his life, like his father's, was a rolling series of misfortunes. He received insurance money after his mom died, and bought a house a week later, it burned down in some drug-related fiasco. His brother David followed a similar path leaving boarding school, he hooked up with Saint, and together they set about snorting and dealing away the years.

Finally, in 2001, on the heels of two drug busts, Saint decided to go straight. With his ex-girlfriend, their daughter and her son, he stayed in a series of shelters, then took them to live in Eureka, several hours north of Oakland. He's since earned a certificate in hotel management, but jobs don't last. And the questions and uncertainties about his father continue to circulate in his head.

"In some ways we turned out similarly," he says. "He was a spy, into secrets and covert activity. I became a drug dealer. What has to be more covert and secret than that? It's the same mind-set. We were just on opposite sides of the -- well, actually, in our case, I guess we weren't even on opposite sides of the law, were we?" T hat time in miami, with saint by his bed and disease eating away at him and him thinking he's six months away from death, E. Howard finally put pen to paper and started writing. Saint had been working toward this moment for a long while, and now it was going to happen. He got his father an A&W diet root beer, then sat down in the old man's wheelchair and waited.

E. Howard scribbled the initials "LBJ," standing for Kennedy's ambitious vice president, Lyndon Johnson. Under "LBJ," connected by a line, he wrote the name Cord Meyer. Meyer was a CIA agent whose wife had an affair with JFK later she was murdered, a case that's never been solved. Next his father connected to Meyer's name the name Bill Harvey, another CIA agent also connected to Meyer's name was the name David Morales, yet another CIA man and a well-known, particularly vicious black-op specialist. And then his father connected to Morales' name, with a line, the framed words "French Gunman Grassy Knoll."

Lucien Sarti (born circa 1931 in Corsica, died April 27, 1972 in Mexico City) was a drug trafficker and killer-for-hire involved in the infamous French Connection heroin network. He was named on the television series The Men Who Killed Kennedy as one of the men who shot U.S. President John F. Kennedy. The series aimed to critically analyze the evidence in the assassination and attacked the official government conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in killing Kennedy.

In one of the late episodes of the series, aired in 2003 on The History Channel , French prisoner Christian David named Sarti as one of three French criminals hired to carry out the assassination of Kennedy on November 22, 1963, when he was interviewed by author Anthony Summers. David's account was corroborated by Michele Nicoli , a former associate of David's who is currently in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's witness protection program. Sarti was the only man David explicitly named, as he had been killed by police in Mexico City in 1972. The trio had all been working for heroin trafficker Auguste Ricord, a known client of the Marseilles underworld, at the time of Kennedy's death

So there it was, according to E. Howard Hunt. LBJ had Kennedy killed. It had long been speculated upon. But now E. Howard was saying that's the way it was. And that Lee Harvey Oswald wasn't the only shooter in Dallas. There was also, on the grassy knoll, a French gunman, presumably the Corsican Mafia assassin Lucien Sarti, who has figured prominently in other assassination theories.

"By the time he handed me the paper, I was in a state of shock," Saint says. "His whole life, to me and everybody else, he'd always professed to not know anything about any of it. But I knew this had to be the truth. If my dad was going to make anything up, he would have made something up about the Mafia, or Castro, or Khrushchev. He didn't like Johnson. But you don't falsely implicate your own country, for Christ's sake. My father is old-school, a dyed-in-the-wool patriot, and that's the last thing he would do."

Later that week, E. Howard also gave Saint two sheets of paper that contained a fuller narrative. It starts out with LBJ again, connecting him to Cord Meyer, then goes on: "Cord Meyer discusses a plot with [David Atlee] Phillips who brings in Wm. Harvey and Antonio Veciana. He meets with Oswald in Mexico City. . . . Then Veciana meets w/ Frank Sturgis in Miami and enlists David Morales in anticipation of killing JFK there. But LBJ changes itinerary to Dallas, citing personal reasons."

The Men Who Killed Kennedy is a video documentary series by Nigel Turner that originally aired in 1988 in the United Kingdom with two one-hour segments about the John F. Kennedy assassination. The United States corporation, Arts & Entertainment Company, purchased the rights to the original two segments. Three one-hour segments were added in 1991. A sixth segment was added in 1995. Finally, three additional hourly segments were added by the History Channel in November 2003.

The ninth segment, titled "The Guilty Men", directly implicated Lyndon B. Johnson. Within days, Johnson's widow, Lady Bird Johnson, more of his surviving associates, ex-President Jimmy Carter, and the lone, living Warren Commission commissioner and ex-President Gerald R. Ford immediately complained to the History Channel. They subsequently threatened legal action against Arts & Entertainment Company, owner of the History Channel. "The Guilty Men" segment was completely withdrawn by the History Channel, that action resulting in considerable controversy.

Also during the series, French prisoner Christian David named Lucien Sarti as one of three French criminals hired to carry out the assassination of Kennedy, when he was interviewed by author Anthony Summers. This claim is one of the most strongly investigated theories presented on the show.

In 2004, a panel of three historians (selected by The History Channel) reviewed the claims made in "The Guilty Men". The History Channel later aired a live discussion about the claims.

David Atlee Phillips, the CIA's Cuban operations chief in Miami at the time of JFK's death, knew E. Howard from the Guatemala-coup days. Veciana is a member of the Cuban exile community. Sturgis, like Saint's father, is supposed to have been one of the three tramps photographed in Dealey Plaza. Sturgis was also one of the Watergate plotters, and he is a man whom E. Howard, under oath, has repeatedly sworn to have not met until Watergate, so to Saint the mention of his name was big news.

In the next few paragraphs, E. Howard goes on to describe the extent of his own involvement. It revolves around a meeting he claims he attended, in 1963, with Morales and Sturgis. It takes place in a Miami hotel room. Here's what happens:

Morales leaves the room, at which point Sturgis makes reference to a "Big Event" and asks E. Howard, "Are you with us?"

E. Howard asks Sturgis what he's talking about.

E. Howard, "incredulous," says to Sturgis, "You seem to have everything you need. Why do you need me?" In the handwritten narrative, Sturgis' response is unclear, though what E. Howard says to Sturgis next isn't: He says he won't "get involved in anything involving Bill Harvey, who is an alcoholic psycho."

After that, the meeting ends. E. Howard goes back to his "normal" life and "like the rest of the country . . . is stunned by JFK's death and realizes how lucky he is not to have had a direct role."

After reading what his father had written, St. John was stunned too. His father had not only implicated LBJ, he'd also, with a few swift marks of a pen, put the lie to almost everything he'd sworn to, under oath, about his knowledge of the assassination. Saint had a million more questions. But his father was exhausted and needed to sleep, and then Saint had to leave town without finishing their talk, though a few weeks later he did receive in the mail a tape recording from his dad. E. Howard's voice on the cassette is weak and grasping, and he sometimes wanders down unrelated pathways. But he essentially remakes the same points he made in his handwritten narrative.

There is no way to confirm Hunt's allegations -- all but one of the co-conspirators he named are long gone. St. John, for his part, believes his father. E. Howard was lucid when he made his confession. He was taking no serious medications, and he and his son were finally on good terms. If anything, St. John believes, his father was holding out on him, the old spy keeping a few secrets in reserve, just in case.

"Actually, there were probably dozens of plots to kill Kennedy, because everybody hated Kennedy but the public," Saint says. "The question is, which one of them worked? My dad has always said, 'Thank God one of them worked.' I think he knows a lot more than he told me. He claimed he backed out of the plot only so he could disclaim actual involvement. In a way, I feel like he only opened another can of worms." He takes a deep breath. "At a certain point, I'm just going to have to let it go."

O ut in Eureka, Saint has been reading an advance copy of E. Howard's autobiography, American Spy. In it, his father looks at LBJ as only one possible person behind the JFK killing, and then only in the most halfhearted, couched-and-cloaked way. He brings up various other possibilities, too, then debunks each of them.

But of all the shadings and omissions in the book, the only one that truly upsets St. John has to do with the happiest moment in his life, that time in 1972, on the night of the Watergate burglary, when he helped his father dispose of the spy gear, then ran money for him and ditched the typewriter.

The way it unfolds in the book, St. John doesn't do anything for his dad. And it's E. Howard himself who dumps the typewriter.

"That's a complete lie," Saint says, almost shouting. "A total fabrication. I did that. I mean, he never took me aside and thanked me in any kind of deep emotional way. But I'm the one who helped him that night. Me! And he's robbing me of it. Why?"

Like so many other things, he will never know why, because the next day, on January 23rd, in the morning, in Miami, the old spymaster dies.

Later in the day, Saint started reading a few of the obituaries.

One starts off, "Sleazebag E. Howard Hunt is finally dead."

"Oh, God," Saint says and goes looking for how The New York Times handled his father's death. The obit reads, "Mr. Hunt was intelligent, erudite, suave and loyal to his friends. But the record shows that he mishandled many of the tasks he received from the CIA and the White House. He was 'totally self-absorbed, totally amoral and a danger to himself and anybody around him. . . .' "

"Wow," Saint says. "I don't know if I can read these things. I mean, that is one brutal obituary."

But the Times is right, of course. E. Howard was a danger to anybody around him, and any list of those in danger would always have to include, right at the top, his firstborn son, St. John.

Ethan Hunt of Mission Impossible fame was named after his father

August 7, 2008

Saint John Hunt speaks with George Butler about his life as the son of E Howard Hunt and his journey to reveal the truth about his beloved father's involvement in the LBJ directed "hit" on President John F Kennedy Jr.

DUBLIN, Calif. (KCBS/AP) -- Sara Jane Moore, who took a shot at President Ford in a 1975 assassination attempt, was released from prison Monday.

Moore, 77, had served about 30 years of a life sentence when she was released from the federal prison in Dublin, east of San Francisco, said Felicia Ponce, a spokeswoman with the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Ponce did not know the details of Moore's release.

Moore was 40 feet away from Ford outside a hotel in San Francisco when she fired a shot at him on Sept. 22, 1975. As she raised her .38-caliber revolver, Oliver Sipple, a disabled former Marine standing next to her, pushed up her arm as the gun went off, and the bullet flew over Ford's head by several feet.

In recent interviews, Moore said she regretted her actions.

``I am very glad I did not succeed. I know now that I was wrong to try,'' Moore said a year ago in an interview with KGO-TV.

Just 17 days before Moore's attempt, Ford had survived the first attempt on his life in Sacramento by Lynette ``Squeaky'' Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson.

Moore said she was blinded by her radical political views at the time, convinced that the government had declared war on the left.

``I was functioning, I think, purely on adrenalin and not thinking clearly. I have often said that I had put blinders on and I was only listening to what I wanted to hear,'' she told KGO.

Moore's confusing background - which included five failed marriages, name changes and involvement with political groups like the Symbionese Liberation Army - baffled the public and even her own defense attorney during her trial.

``I never got a satisfactory answer from her as to why she did it,'' said retired federal public defender James F. Hewitt. ``There was just bizarre stuff, and she would never tell anyone anything about her background.''

Ford insisted the two attempts on his life shouldn't prevent him from having contact with the American people. ``If we can't have the opportunity of talking with one another, seeing one another, shaking hands with one another, something has gone wrong in our society. I think it's important that we as a people don't capitulate to the wrong element,'' he said.

Ford died a little over a year ago from natural causes.

Moore was born Sara Jane Kahn in Charleston, W.Va. She acted in high school plays and dreamed of being a film actress before going through a series of marriages, beginning with nuptials to Marine sergeant Wallace Elvin Anderson in 1949.

That marriage ended after less than a month. Moore later married and had three children with an Air Force officer named Sydney Louis Manning, who brought her to California. In 1958, she married and went on to have a child with John Frederick Wilhelm Aalberg, who she said worked in Hollywood.

She started using her mother's maiden name, Moore, shortly after marrying Bay Area doctor Willard Carmel. That marriage also ended.

In the 1970s, Moore began working for People in Need, a free food ransom arrangement established by millionaire Randy Hearst in return for his daughter Patty, who was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974. She soon became involved with radical leftists, ex-convicts and other members of San Francisco's counterculture. At this time, Moore became an informant to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Moore has said she fired at Ford because she thought she would be killed once it was disclosed that she was an FBI informant. The agency ended its relationship with her about four months before the shooting.

``I was going to go down anyway,'' she said in a 1982 interview with the San Jose Mercury News. ``And if I was going to go down, I was going to do it my way. If the government was going to kill me, I was going to make some kind of statement.''

Moore was sent to a West Virgina women's prison in 1977. Two years later, she escaped, but was captured several hours later.

She was later transferred to a prison in Pleasanton, Calif., before coming to Dublin.

In 2000, Moore sued the warden of her federal prison to prevent him from taking keys given to inmates to lock themselves in as a security measure.

Ford told FBI about panel's doubts on JFK murder

By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN Associated Press Writer © 2008 The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Former President Ford secretly advised the FBI that two of his fellow members on the Warren Commission doubted the FBI's conclusion that John F. Kennedy was shot from the sixth floor of the Texas Book Depository in Dallas, according to newly released records from Ford's FBI files.

Ford, still a congressman at the time, also told a senior FBI official about internal panel disputes over hiring staff, Chief Justice Earl Warren's timetable for completing the final report on the assassination and what panel members said about the FBI.

In turn, Assistant FBI Director Cartha "Deke" DeLoach confidentially advised Ford of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover's position on panel disputes discussed where leaks were coming from and, with Hoover's personal approval, loaned him a bureau briefcase with a lock so he could securely take the FBI report on the 1963 assassination with him on a ski trip.

The new details were included in 500 pages of the FBI's large file on Ford, released in part this past week in response to requests under the Freedom of Information Act that The Associated Press and others made on the day Ford died in December 2006. The FBI intends to release additional documents about Ford in several batches, all with parts censored for law enforcement and privacy reasons.

That Ford served as the FBI's eyes and ears inside the commission has been known for years. Long ago, the government released a 1963 FBI memo that said Ford, then a Republican congressman from Michigan, had volunteered to keep the FBI informed about the panel's private deliberations, but only if that relationship remained confidential. The bureau agreed.

It was also well-known Ford was an outspoken proponent of the bureau's conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald killed Kennedy acting alone.

A newly released memorandum provides more details about Ford's role as the FBI's informant. DeLoach wrote on Dec. 17, 1963, to outline what Ford told him in the congressman's office about the commission meeting the day before.

"Two members of the commission brought up the fact that they still were not convinced that the President had been shot from the sixth floor window of the Texas Book Depository," DeLoach wrote. "These members failed to understand the trajectory of the slugs that killed the President. He stated he felt this point would be discussed further but, of course, would represent no problem."

There was no explanation of what Ford meant by "no problem."

Warren Commission records released in 1997 revealed that in the final report Ford changed the staff's original description of one of Kennedy's wounds. Ford said then he only made the description more precise. Skeptics said Ford's wording falsely made the wound seem higher on the body to make the panel's conclusion that one bullet hit both Kennedy and Texas Gov. John Connally more plausible.

DeLoach also wrote that Ford wanted to take the FBI's confidential assassination report on a ski vacation but had no way to do so "in complete safety." DeLoach recommended lending Ford a bureau briefcase with a lock. The bottom of the memo contains a handwritten "OK" over Hoover's distinctive initial "H," which he regularly used in commenting on memos.

Most of the newly disclosed documents describe the relationship between the FBI under Hoover and influential members of Congress or the judiciary once Hoover was convinced that they were allies.

Hoover rewarded Ford with personal notes that congratulated him on re-election and on awards, thanked Ford for publicly defending the bureau and expressed sympathy over the death of Ford's mother. In turn, Ford responded with private and public praise for Hoover and the FBI.

Like other friendly officials, Ford was granted favors. Some Ford sought: a photo of Hoover, background checks on a maid the Fords wanted to hire and on a man with a Swedish accent seeking public office in Ford's district but who had not answered all his neighbors' questions about his personal background. Others were surprise gifts, such as a signed copy of Hoover's book on communism.

Ford was elected to Congress in 1948. Hoover first congratulated him on his re-election in 1952 and thereafter. An internal FBI memo in 1965 said that, "though we did experience some difficulty with all the members of the Warren Commission, Ford was of considerable help to the Bureau."

Many of the newly released records describe the bureau's controversial surveillance of anti-war and civil rights protesters as the FBI reported on plans for protest demonstrations at Ford's public appearances as a congressman, vice president and president.

Two documents provide a rare glimpse of the depth of security fears during the Cold War:

_A memo from Nov. 9, 1969, said the FBI performed a security check at Ford's request of telephones at his home in Virginia, his line at the phone company's central office and all points between. The FBI found no bugs, but a foreman said installation of new touch-tone dialing equipment in the area may have caused "some inadvertent noise on Mr. Ford's line."

_A memo from Dec. 2, 1959, showed the Navy was considering inviting Ford to a strategy conference at the Naval War College and asked the FBI — fully 11 years after Ford was first elected to Congress — whether Ford had any "subversive nature." The famously tightlipped FBI had amassed a large file on Ford, but replied only that when Ford had applied to work for the FBI in 1942 its background investigation "revealed no pertinent derogatory information."

Dallas Morning News, TX
www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D92EQII00.html

Bellingham Herald, WA
www.bellinghamherald.com/354/story/490428.html

The Guardian UK
www.guardian.co.uk/world/feedarticle/7712908

Houston Chronicle, United States
www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/tx/5933818.html

Ethan Hunt of Mission Impossible fame was named after his father
August 7, 2008

Saint John Hunt speaks with George Butler about his life as the son of E Howard Hunt and his journey to reveal the truth about his beloved father's involvement in the LBJ directed "hit" on President John F Kennedy Jr.

Years had gone by when he and St. John hardly spoke. But then St. John came to him wanting to know if he had any information about the assassination of President Kennedy. Despite almost universal skepticism, his father had always maintained that he didn't. He swore to this during two government investigations. "I didn't have anything to do with the assassination, didn't know anything about it," he said during one of them. "I did my time for Watergate. I shouldn't have to do additional time and suffer additional losses for something I had nothing to do with."

But now, in August 2003, propped up in his sickbed, paper on his lap, pen in hand and son sitting next to him, he began to write down the names of men who had indeed participated in a plot to kill the president. He had lied during those two federal investigations. He knew something after all. He told St. John about his own involvement, too. It was explosive stuff, with the potential to reconfigure the JFK-assassination-theory landscape. And then he got better and went on to live for four more years.

They sure don't make White House bad guys the way they used to. Today you've got flabby-faced half-men like Karl Rove, with weakling names like "Scooter" Libby, blandly hacking their way through the constraints of the U.S. Constitution, while back then, in addition to Hunt, you had out-and-out thugs like G. Gordon Liddy, his Watergate co-conspirator and Nixon's dirty-tricks chief, who would hold his own hand over an open flame to prove what a real tough guy he was. It all seems a little nutty now, but in 1972 it was serious business. These guys meant to take the powers of the presidency and run amok. Hunt, an ex-CIA man who loved operating in the shadows and joined Nixon's Special Investigations Unit (a.k.a. "the Plumbers") as a $100-a-day consultant in 1971, specialized in political sabotage. Among his first assignments: forging cables linking the Kennedy administration to the assassination of South Vietnam's president. After that, he began sniffing around Ted Kennedy's dirty laundry, to see what he could dig up there. Being a former CIA man, he had no problem contemplating the use of firebombs and once thought about slathering LSD on the steering wheel of an unfriendly newspaperman's car, hoping it would leach into his skin and cause a fatal accident. But of all his various plots and subterfuges, in the end, only one of them mattered: the failed burglary at the Watergate Hotel, in Washington, D.C., in the spring of 1972.

The way it happened, Hunt enlisted some Cuban pals from his old Bay of Pigs days to fly up from Miami and bug the Democratic National Committee headquarters, which was located inside the Watergate. Also on the team were a couple of shady ex-government operators named James McCord and Frank Sturgis. The first attempt ended when the outfit's lock picker realized he'd brought the wrong tools. The next time, however, with Hunt stationed in a Howard Johnson's hotel room across the way, communicating with the burglars by walkie-talkie, the team gained entry into the office. Unfortunately, on the way into the building, they'd taped open an exit door to allow their escape, and when a night watchman found it, he called the cops. The burglars were arrested on the spot. One of them had E. Howard's phone number, at the White House, no less, in his address book. Following this lead, police arrested Hunt and charged him with burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping. Abandoned by his bosses at the White House, he soon began trying to extort money from them to help pay his mounting bills, as well as those of his fellow burglars, the deal being that if the White House paid, all those arrested would plead guilty and maintain silence about the extent of the White House's involvement.

That December, his wife, Dorothy, carrying $10,000 in $100 bills, was killed in a plane crash, foul play suspected but never proved. Two years later, impeachment imminent, Nixon resigned his presidency. And in 1973, E. Howard Hunt, the man who had unwittingly set all these events in motion, pleaded guilty and ultimately spent thirty-three months in prison. "I cannot escape feeling," he said at the time, "that the country I have served for my entire life and which directed me to carry out the Watergate entry is punishing me for doing the very things it trained and directed me to do."

8 Comments:

Howard Hunt fired the decoy shot on the knoll so he was a benchwarmer as he said.

Chauncey Holt was a doppelganger as were Charles Harrelson and Charles Rodgers.


Lucien Sarti

After the dying of E. Howard Hunt in 2007, Howard St. John Hunt and David Hunt said that their father had recorded a number of claims about himself and others being concerned in a conspiracy to assassinate John F. Kennedy. [10] [11] In the April 5, 2007 difficulty of Rolling Stone, Howard St. John Hunt detailed plenty of people presupposed to be implicated by his father together with Sarti, in addition to Lyndon B. Johnson, Cord Meyer, David Phillips, Frank Sturgis, David Morales, and William Harvey. [11] [12] The two sons alleged that their father reduce the data from his memoirs, “American Spy: My Secret History within the CIA, Watergate and Beyond”, to keep away from potential perjury expenses. [10] According to Hunt’s widow and different youngsters, the 2 sons took benefit of Hunt’s lack of lucidity by teaching and exploiting him for monetary achieve. [10] The Los Angeles Times mentioned they examined the supplies provided by the sons to assist the story and located them to be “inconclusive”. [10]

In November 1988, Steve J. Rivele’s French-published e-book The Murderers of John F. Kennedy named Sarti as one in all three French gangsters concerned within the assassination of John F. Kennedy. [8] Rivele claimed Sarti fired the deadly shot from Dealey Plaza’s “grassy knoll”. [8] According to Rivele, Sarti, Roger Bocagnani, and Sauveur Pironti had been contracted by organized crime within the United States to guard their drug pursuits. [8] [9] The British two-hour tv particular The Men Who Killed Kennedy was primarily based on Rivele’s e-book, however preceded its launch airing on October 25, 1988. [8] [9] In the French newspaper Le Provençal printed the day following the particular, Pironti denied the allegation, stating that he believed on the time of the assassination that Sarti was held in Marseille’s Baumettes Prison and that Bocagnani was in Bordeaux’s Fort du Hâ. [9] He additionally confirmed the paper navy data proving that he was serving on a minesweeper from October 1962 to April 1964. [9] The French Ministry of Justice said that Bocagnani was in jail on the day of Kennedy’s assassination and officers from the French Navy confirmed Pironti’s navy service. [9]

On April 19, 1968, Sarti was arrested together with Ricord and Chiappe for questioning concerning the theft of a department of the Central Bank of Argentina. [5] The three had been launched as a consequence of lack of proof. [5] In April 1972, Sarti was shot to dying in Mexico City throughout a raid of a drug trafficking ring by the Mexican federal police. [3] [5] [6] A detective in Rio de Janeiro was later suspended from the police pressure after being accused of accepting a bribe to free Sarti and Helena Ferreira, his girlfriend, from jail earlier in 1972. [7] In January 1975, 4 French residents alleged to have provided heroin to Sarti had been amongst a gaggle of 19 indicted by a federal grand jury in Brooklyn. [6]

In 1948, Sarti based the group Piedra Fuerte with fellow Corsicans Auguste Ricord and Francois Chiappe, which smuggled opium within the Golden Triangle. Chiappe was identified to be a part of the Organisation armée secrète, a French dissident paramilitary terrorist group that carried out focused assassinations and bombings, together with the tried assassination of Charles de Gaulle in 1962. [4]


Lucien Sarti - History

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Deathbed confession: Who really killed JFK?

E. Howard Hunt’s son, Saint John Hunt, released an audio of his father’s deathbed confession taken over a series of father-son meetings in 2007, but the mainstream press all but ignored it. Hunt said the hit was given the code name – “The Big Event.” The only major print media to cover the confession was Rolling Stone.

Near the end of Hunt’s life he made several allegations about the Nov. 22, 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. In an audio recording, Hunt claimed several people were involved in a conspiracy to kill JFK. He said Lyndon B. Johnson ordered the assassination and assigned Cord Meyer to carry out the plan. Meyer recruited David Phillips , Frank Sturgis , David Morales , William Harvey , a French gunman , and Lucien Sarti , who worked for the Mafia.

Hunt testifies before the Watergate Committee. (Wikipedia)

Hunt’s deathbed confession has been discredited because the convicted Watergate felon has a history of stretching the truth, including forging documents in the National Archives blaming JFK for the Diem assassination. His son now has even suggested his father lied when he claimed he was in Washington, D.C., at home at the time of the assassination. His son insists his father was in Dallas, which makes it even more difficult to figure out when Hunt is telling the truth. Hunt and Sturgis were once suspects in the assassination, but ruled out by the Warren Commission. However, to this day some believe they were the two men on the Grassy Knoll.

The two men also were linked in the Watergate scandal.

  • Police arrested Sturgis with four other men at the Democratic party headquarters on the sixth floor of Watergate in 1972. The men wore rubber surgical gloves, and carried extensive photographic equipment and electronic surveillance devices. He was also linked to the Miami Cuban exile community where he was involved in “adventures” relating to Cuba which he felt were organized and financed by the CIA.
  • Police arrested Hunt, a former White House aide, as one of the “plumbers” during the Watergate scandal. He was directly linked to Sturgis and the other four men that broke into Watergate. He was charged with burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping. He served 33 months. Hunt, a former CIA operative, served from 1949-1970. He died on January 23, 2007, in Miami of pneumonia.

But Hunt’s LBJ allegation is what appears to throw this particular confession into one big lie.

For example, Watergate figure H.R. Haldeman’s said Nixon asked Johnson during Watergate to “call off your dogs, or I’ll tell about how you tapped my phone in 󈨈 during the election.”

Johnson replied, “If you tell that, I’ll tell …”

We don’t know what that was about because it was censored. But the best guess appears that it would be about the JFK assassination. Why, then would Johnson expose information on JFK, if he was involved? That makes no sense.

But nevertheless Hunt has provided some nibbles of truth by turning over some names as perhaps bait for readers to buy the whole story he was selling to his son. He claims in his confession that he was merely a “benchwarmer” not truly a participant. That comes hard to swallow because Hunt was hardly a benchwarmer throughout his career.

Nevertheless, the confession detailed the following key participants in the John F. Kennedy assassination.


Spotters:

In typical Assassination anatomy you have a surveillance team, which is separate from but covers for the actual hit team. Most snipers usually work with a spotter, since it's so useful to have another set of eyes which isn't looking through the narrow scope of a gun sight. The spotters may work directly alongside the shooter, or they may also work from a separate location and convey commands to the sniper via a communication link such as a radio.

These two individuals have drawn some increased attention from Assassination researchers since one of them appears to be carrying a radio. The Cuban looking man on the left has been identified by some researchers as Vidal Santiago. While the other man is identified here as Gordon Novel, although some have pointed out that he also looks like, and is wearing the same clothes as the "blond tramp" whom we will examine in the next section.


Lucien Sarti

Lucien Sarti (* 1931 in Corsica , † April 27, 1972 in Mexico City ) was a French drug courier and hit man of the infamous French Connection heroin network. In the television series " The Men Who Killed Kennedy " he was referred to as one of the snipers who were directly involved in the assassination attempt on John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 .

The said series critically examined the evidence of the Kennedy assassination and attacked the official account that the murder was carried out by Lee Harvey Oswald alone .

In one of the episodes that aired on the History Channel in 2003 , writer Anthony Summers spoke to French prisoner Christian David, who knew Sarti well and had learned numerous details about the assassination from Sarti himself. David's testimony was corroborated by Michele Nicoli , who also worked as a drug courier and is currently protected by a US Drug Enforcement Administration witness protection program .

Christian David, Lucien Sarti and Michelle Nicoli worked for the heroin dealer Auguste Ricord , a well-known figure in the Marseille underworld . According to statements by Christian David, he was asked in the spring of 1963 by none other than Antoine Guérini , the most powerful Mafia boss in Marseille, whether he might be prepared to kill "a highly placed American politician". When asked who was meant, Guérini replied: "The biggest vegetable", that is, Kennedy. David declined the offer as too dangerous. At a meeting with Sarti in Buenos Aires two years later , David learned that Sarti had taken on the job. The author Stephen Revelle describes Sarti as the shooter who shot Kennedy from the hill known as Grassy Knoll and fired the decisive, fatal headshot. In 1972 Sarti got into a gun battle with the police in Mexico City and was shot dead.

Sarti was first referred to as a member of the heroin mafia in 1980 by the journalist Henrik Krüger.

According to other accounts, mafia killer James Files shot off the hill. He charged himself with the murder of Kennedy in 1994.


Contents

1988 to 2003 Edit

The Men Who Killed Kennedy began with two 50-minute segments originally aired on 25 October 1988 in the United Kingdom, entitled simply Part One and Part Two. The programmes were produced by Central Television for the ITV network, and was followed three weeks later with a studio discussion on the issues titled The Story Continues, chaired by broadcaster Peter Sissons.

The original broadcast was controversial in Britain. The episodes identified three men as the assassins of Kennedy: deceased drug trafficker Lucien Sarti and two living men (Roger Bocagnani and Sauveur Pironti). All three were later revealed to have strong alibis: Sarti was undergoing medical treatment in France, another was in prison at the time, and the third had been in the French Navy. One of the two living men threatened to sue, and Central Television's own subsequent investigation into the allegations revealed they were "total nonsense". Turner justified his failure to interview one of the accused on the grounds that the individual was "too dangerous". Turner was censured by the British Parliament. The Independent Broadcasting Authority forced Central Television to produce a third episode dedicated to the false allegations, which aired on November 16, 1988, which was later referred to as a "studio crucifixion" of Turner and his inaccuracies. [2]

The United States corporation, Arts & Entertainment Company, purchased the rights to the original two segments. In 1989, the series was nominated for a Flaherty Documentary Award. [3] In November 1991, the series was re-edited with additional material and divided into three 50-minute programmes, which were also shown by ITV on consecutive nights. An additional episode appeared in 1995. The series typically aired in November every year and from time to time during the year.

2003 onwards Edit

In November 2003, three additional segments ("The Final Chapter") were added by the History Channel, entitled, respectively, "The Smoking Guns", "The Love Affair" and "The Guilty Men".

"The Smoking Guns" examines claims of changes to the procedures normally followed by the Secret Service on the day of the assassination, bullet damage to windshield of the president's limousine consistent with a bullet fired through it from the front, and discrepancies between observations made by the doctors who treated Kennedy at Parkland Hospital after the shooting and the official autopsy and photographs of the president's body which were cited by the Warren Commission. [4]

"The Love Affair" focused on the claims of Judyth Vary Baker to have been Lee Harvey Oswald's lover in 1963, and to have worked with Oswald and others to develop a cancer-causing biological weapon as part of a CIA plan to assassinate Fidel Castro. [5] [6]

The third of these additional segments – "The Guilty Men" – was based substantially on the book Blood, Money & Power: How L.B.J. Killed J.F.K. by Barr McClellan. [7] The book and the episode directly implicates Lyndon B. Johnson (LBJ) – who was the U.S. Vice President at the time of the assassination – and its airing in 2003 created an outcry among Johnson's surviving associates, including Johnson's widow, Lady Bird Johnson, former LBJ aides Bill Moyers and Jack Valenti (longtime president of the Motion Picture Association of America), as well as U.S. Presidents Gerald Ford – who was the last-living (at the time of the outcry) Warren Commission member – and Jimmy Carter. These Johnson supporters lodged complaints of libel with the History Channel, and subsequently threatened legal action against Arts & Entertainment Company, owner of the History Channel. [8] The History Channel responded by assembling a panel of three historians, Robert Dallek, Stanley Kutler, and Thomas Sugrue. On a program aired April 7, 2004, titled "The Guilty Man: A Historical Review," the panel agreed that the documentary was not credible and should not have aired. The History Channel issued a statement saying, in part, "The History Channel recognizes that 'The Guilty Men' failed to offer viewers context and perspective, and fell short of the high standards that the network sets for itself. The History Channel apologized to its viewers and to Mrs. Johnson and her family for airing the show." The channel said it would not show the episode again. Author Barr McClellan, on whose work the episode was largely based, complained that he had tried to cooperate with the reviewing historians to discuss his evidence with them, and had been ignored. [7] [9]

Malcolm Liggett, a retired economics professor, labor economist at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and employee of the Office for Wage and Price Stability in the Executive Office of the President from 1975 to 1981 [10] sued A&E regarding the episode "The Smoking Guns," which claimed Liggett was involved in a conspiracy to kill Kennedy. Liggett and A&E reached a settlement, which required that a letter by Liggett be read on the show History Center. [11]

David Browne of Entertainment Weekly described the documentary as "well-researched, but still farfetched". [12] Addressing "The Guilty Men" episode, Dorothy Rabinowitz of The Wall Street Journal called it a "primitive piece of conspiracy-mongering" and wrote that "the documentary's ever deepening mess of charges and motives is never less than clear about its main point—that Lyndon Johnson personally arranged the murder not only of the president, but also seven other people, including his own sister." [13]

In a letter to the chief executives of the three parent companies of A & E Networks, — Victor F. Ganzi of the Hearst Corporation, Michael D. Eisner of Disney, and Robert C. Wright of NBC — former United States President Gerald Ford described the allegations as "the most damaging accusations ever made against a former vice president and president in American history." [14]

The first two episodes were followed by "The Story Continues" (16 November 1988), a critical studio discussion about them. The final episode was followed by a critical review, "The Guilty Men: A Historical Review." (7 April 2004).


Lucien Sarti

Lucien Sarti (circa 1931 – April 27, 1972) was a drug trafficker and killer-for-hire involved in the infamous French Connection heroin network. He was named on the television series The Men Who Killed Kennedy, as well as in a deathbed confession by former CIA agent E. Howard Hunt, as one of the men who shot at U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Dealy Plaza on the day of his assassination. The series aimed to critically analyze the evidence in the assassination and attacked the Warren Commission conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in killing Kennedy.

In one of the late episodes of the series, aired in 2003 on The History Channel, French prisoner Christian David named Sarti as one of three French criminals hired to carry out the assassination of Kennedy on November 22, 1963, when he was interviewed by author Anthony Summers. David's account was corroborated by Michel Nicoli, a former associate of David's who is currently in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's witness protection program. Sarti was the only man David explicitly named, as Sarti had been killed by police in Mexico City in 1972. The trio had all been working for heroin trafficker Auguste Ricord, a known client of the Marseilles underworld, at the time of Kennedy's death.

Writer Stephen Rivele, the man who named Sarti on "The Men Who Killed Kennedy", said that Sarti was the one who had fired from the grassy knoll and hit the president in the head. As well as Lucien Sarti, he also named Sauveur Pironti and Roger Bocognani as being involved in the killing. However, Pironti and Bocognani both had alibis and Rivele was forced to withdraw the allegation.

Journalistic and police sources in Paris and Marseilles told Revelle that Sarti was known as an extremely daring and reckless man, known and despised even by his own associates for taking enormous chances but that the willingness to take these chances was what made him such a successful drug trafficker and assassin.

Read more about Lucien Sarti: Further Reading

Famous quotes containing the word lucien :

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Marc Perkel Rantz

Fourty years ago President Kennedy was assassinated. He was shot in the head from the front from the grassy knowl and not by Oswald in the Schoolbook Depository. Fourty years later we still don't know who killed Kennedy, but whoever it was, they got away with it - so far. I find that disturbing - especially with the government we have today.

It's been 801 days since 9-11. Bin Laden is still free - are you?

Posted by marc at November 21, 2003 10:44 PM | TrackBack

The thing J.F.K.'s life sybolized to me could only be confirmedand realized by his assaination. To me it maders not who killed him, or even why. The gift of hope we all share in his memorey is one of the few thing's in American culture and history that brings us togatherand gives us hope.

Posted by: Brian at November 23, 2003 11:41 PM

As the leader of the "Church of Reality", it's intriguing that without compelling evidence you so easily "buy into" the JFK conspiracy theory.

This doesn't bode well for the future of your church.

No contributions from this reality oriented individual.

Perhaps if your lucky the church of reality will survive and some future leader with reality vision will take over and grow it into something more real?

Posted by: Ben Laughing at November 25, 2003 09:00 AM

Brian: I agree that Marc's entry above could have benefited from a reference or a link to a Web-page that analyses the facts of the JFK assassination and confirms his assessment. Such an analysis is not very hard for the reader to find, however.

This parallel inevitably makes me think about Oliver Stone - his 1991 movie "JFK", and his opinions on the fundamental causes of 9/11. It also makes me think of the opposing views on both those theories, as well as the views that fall elsewhere.

I don't yet have a solid opinion on either of those events that I am comfortable with. One thing is certain: not all facts are known to the public. No event is ever 100.0% documented and straightforward. Events such as that do not enter the "Tree of Knowledge" as objective chapters in history books, but rather as puzzle pieces of facts, opinions, and individual experiences. Those pieces may never all fit, but in my opinion it doesn't make them any less real.

Posted by: Alex Libman at November 26, 2003 11:18 AM

At this point I believe the shooter was a man named Lucien Sarti, a professional sharpshooter from Marseilles who liked wearing uniforms and used exploding bullets. Details about this theory can be found on this page called Corsican Connection:

I first saw details of this theory on the BBC series "The Men Who Killed Kennedy" that plays every year on the History Channel.

Posted by: Simon Seamount at November 29, 2003 07:02 PM

Anyone who has studied the documentation on the JFK murder must feel that Oswald if involved was not alone. Trained officers at the scene rushed the grassy knoll. People behind Kennedy's car were splattered with blood and brains. Part of his skull was found on the trunk of the car. This indicates a shot from the right front. In 1979 a special committe of the House of Represntatives stated that the Warren Commission Report was deeply flawed. When you look at all the evidence including the so-called "magic bullet" I feel that one must conclude that the truth is still hasn't come to light.

Posted by: Knight Templar at November 30, 2003 04:06 PM

Seems to me it's just a friendly reminder that you can assasinate somebody and still get away with it. even if it is the president.. hint hint? wink wink even?

Posted by: Colin at December 9, 2003 06:20 PM

Seems to me it's just a friendly reminder that you can assasinate somebody and still get away with it. even if it is the president.. hint hint? wink wink even?

Posted by: Colin at December 9, 2003 06:21 PM

Seems to me it's just a friendly reminder that you can assasinate somebody and still get away with it. even if it is the president.. hint hint? wink wink even?

Posted by: Colin at December 9, 2003 06:21 PM

Seems to me it's just a friendly reminder that you can assasinate somebody and still get away with it. even if it is the president.. hint hint? wink wink even?

Posted by: Colin at December 9, 2003 06:21 PM

Posted by: wayne kerr at January 9, 2004 01:29 AM

It is crystal-clear now to anyone that JFK was shot from different directions almost simultaneously,probably by professional hitmen from the French-Corsican drugmafia on orders from the American Crime Syndicate and from the CIA.They just didn't want a piece-president.The fatal headshot was delivered by a gunman who stood behind a wooden fence on the grassy knoll in front of Kennedy.That shooter was disguised as a police agent,wearing a Dallas police uniform. Just guess what that implicates.
Later on,after the Secret Service flew with the body from Love Field,the name of the Dallas airport,Kennedy's body had been altered and two body bags were exchanged to frame the public opinion and to conceal the plot by the government(the next president in line ,Lyndon Johnson,and his entourage of admirals and generals.By the way,the mayor of Dallas was the brother of the deputy CIA Director General Charles Cabell,who had been fired by Kennedy after the desastrous Bay of Pigs Invasion.General Cabell became active again in 1965,he waited a year. as a employee with Boeing Company,a company,closely involved in the Fighter-Mafia,producing fighter-planes for the government serving as war-planes in the Vietnam-War.
Jewish people,such as the president of Israel and the Canadian Jew Major Bloomfield also was involved in the plot of killing Kennedy.

Posted by: Patrik B. at April 16, 2004 02:10 PM

It is crystal-clear now to anyone that JFK was shot from different directions almost simultaneously,probably by professional hitmen from the French-Corsican drugmafia on orders from the American Crime Syndicate and from the CIA.They just didn't want a piece-president.The fatal headshot was delivered by a gunman who stood behind a wooden fence on the grassy knoll in front of Kennedy.That shooter was disguised as a police agent,wearing a Dallas police uniform. Just guess what that implicates.
Later on,after the Secret Service flew with the body from Love Field,the name of the Dallas airport,Kennedy's body had been altered and two body bags were exchanged to frame the public opinion and to conceal the plot by the government(the next president in line ,Lyndon Johnson,and his entourage of admirals and generals.)By the way,the mayor of Dallas was the brother of the deputy CIA Director General Charles Cabell,who had been fired by Kennedy after the desastrous Bay of Pigs Invasion.General Cabell became active again in 1965,he waited a year. as a employee with Boeing Company,a company,closely involved in the Fighter-Mafia,producing fighter-planes for the government serving as war-planes in the Vietnam-War.
Jewish people,such as the president of Israel and the Canadian Jew Major Bloomfield also were involved in the plot of killing Kennedy.

Posted by: Patrik B. at April 16, 2004 02:13 PM

LUCIAN SARTI ALIAS ''BADGEMAN '' UNDOUBTLY DELIVERED THE FATAL HEADSHOT FROM THE ''GRASSY KNOLL''. TO BELIEVE OTHERWISE WOULD BE IN DENIAL.


Watch the video: Lucien Agoume - Skills, Tackles, Passes u0026 Best Actions - 2021 (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Nirg

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  2. Howi

    you, by chance, not the expert?

  3. Starling

    I think you are wrong. I can defend my position. Email me at PM, we will discuss.

  4. George

    What words ... Great, a remarkable idea



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